Don't live in Ashburn? Set your location to find movies & showtimes near you.
The Peanuts Movie Movie Poster

Trivia for The Peanuts Movie

Showing all 74 items
Jump to: Spoilers (9)
  • This is the fifth theatrical Peanuts film, after A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969), Snoopy Come Home (1972), Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown (1977), and Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (and Don't Come Back!!) (1980).
  • The first theatrical Peanuts movie in 35 years.
  • The third film from Blue Sky Studios, after Ice Age (2002) and Epic (2013), to not have John Powell compose the musical score.
  • This the first "Peanuts" film made with computer-generated imagery.
  • Snoopy's noises and Woodstock's chirpings are recycled from old Bill Melendez recordings.
  • Steve Martino was chosen as director because the Schulz family was impressed with his adaptation of the Dr. Seuss novel Horton Hears a Who! (2008).
  • Steve Martino and the animators spent over a year looking at Charles M. Schulz' "Peanuts" comics to help translate the "hand-drawn warmth of Schulz' artwork into the cool pixel-precision of CGI."
  • The script was created in 2006 by Charles M. Schulz's son and grandson Craig Schulz and Bryan Schulz, respectively.
  • Blue Sky Studios' 10th feature film.
  • First Peanuts film since the death of creator Charles M. Schulz in 2000.
  • Like the comic strip, you never see the bottom of Snoopy's dog house in the Flying Ace sequence.
  • Various steps were taken with the animation to emulate the original look and feel of the comics and the previous animated specials. For example, the trees and other foliage in the background are static and never billow or sway in the wind. Even on the characters, their animation appears "jagged" and skippy. This was done to emulate the low quality hand drawn animation that the Peanuts television specials were known for.
  • The Royal Guardsmen sang "Snoopy vs. the Red Baron", "The Return of the Red Baron", and "Snoopy's Christmas". These three songs are a trilogy. "Snoopy vs. the Red Baron" is one of the greatest novelty songs ever released during the 1960s. It was #2 on the US Billboard Charts during the last days of 1966. Other Snoopy songs by the Royal Guardsmen are "Snoopy for President" (1968) and "The Littlest Astronaut" (1978)
  • Charles M. Schulz said that Charlie Brown is in fact not bald. He has blonde hair, but it is so transparent, you can't see it.
  • This movie is being released 50 years after A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965), the first Peanuts animated short, as well as being released 65 years after the first Peanuts comic strip.
  • Kristin Chenoweth, who voices Fifi, won a Tony Award for her portrayal of Sally Brown in the 1999 Broadway revival of the musical "You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown".
  • The same year this movie came out, Charles M. Schulz was inducted into the California Hall of Fame. His wife Jean Schulz accepted the award on his behalf.
  • Charlie Brown hands Patty and Violet a comic book with Spark Plug the Horse from the comic strip "Barney Google" on the cover. Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz's nickname was "Sparky" after this character.
  • The moving company is named Mendelson & Melendez, after Lee Mendelson and Bill Melendez, the long-time executive producers of the animated Peanuts TV specials.
  • On the field of Charlie Brown's hapless baseball team, there are three pegs for the visitor score and just one peg for the home team.
  • Released theatrically in theaters with Cosmic Scrat-tastrophe (2015). The short is shown to be a sneak peek for the 5th Ice Age movie: Ice Age Collison Course (2016).
  • Lucy mentions real estate when talking to Charlie Brown about the Little Red Haired Girl, a recurring topic on her mind in various media throughout the years.
  • Schulz, inspired by his son's love for World War One airplane models, created the Red Baron as Snoopy's nemesis. A model triplane is featured prominently in the film.
  • Charlie Brown does his book report on "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy, which was Charles Schulz' favorite novel.
  • Charles Schulz' wanted to call his comic strip "Charlie Brown" (it had started out as "Good Ol' Charlie Brown"), but the editors were worried about legal action from people who had that name. It started publication as "Lil' Folks", but because that was the original title of someone else's strip, his syndicate forced the title "Peanuts" on him. He hated the title (partly because it made people assume the character's name was Peanut) and didn't use it in any of the specials or movies, which were titled "Charlie Brown" or "Snoopy". This is thus the first ever "Peanuts" feature to actually carry that title.
  • The aircraft Snoopy tries to rescue Fifi from in his fantasy sequence resembles a pre-WWI German Zeppelin airship.
  • The Beagle Scouts, Snoopy's bird friends who all resemble Woodstock, appear in the film as the pit crew for Snoopy's plane in the World War I Flying Ace sequences. The birds are named Conrad, Bill, Olivier and Harriet. In the comics, Harriet is generally portrayed as the toughest while Olivier (likely the bird who appears to mess up constantly in the movie) is the dumbest.
  • Snoopy's siblings, Andy, Olaf, Marbles, Spike, and Belle, appear in the mid-credits scene. Two additional siblings, Molly and Rover, were created for the televised specials but not by Charles M. Schulz himself and are omitted from the scene.
  • While the World War I Flying Ace is struggling to return to his airfield, he is briefly shown sporting a wiry mustache as he is crawling through the desert. This is a reference to Snoopy's brother Spike, who was named after Charles Schulz' childhood dog and appeared infrequently in the comics. Spike wore the same mustache and lived in the desert country near Needles, California.
  • There is a series of numbers on the test rank list for Charlie Brown's class, 555 95472, which is actually the name of one of Charlie Brown's classmates. 5 (as he calls himself) first appeared in the Peanuts comic strip from September 30-October 4, 1963. He has two little sisters, 3 and 4.
  • On the back of the "Spark Plug" comic book Charlie Brown recommends to Patty and Violet, a "Lil' Folks" panel can be briefly seen with Patty and Shermy. "Li'l Folks" was a single-panel comic strip drawn by Charles M. Schulz from 1947 to 1950, and a precursor to the "Peanuts" strip.
  • This marks the first film from Blue Sky Studios to be nominated for a Golden Globe at the 2016 Golden Globe Awards.
  • The dance moves the kids have are the same ones from A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965), with only two differences: * Schroeder's dance was newly animated, since he played the piano in the Christmas special instead of dancing. * Violet and Patty have swapped dance styles from the Christmas special.
  • Other than Snoopy Come Home (1972), this is the only other Peanuts movie without Charlie Brown's name in the title.
  • When Snoopy enters his dog house to fetch the instructions in order to help Charlie Brown learn to dance, he throws a bunch of stuff out. Among those, is the painting "Starry Night", by Vincent van Gogh. This is a reference to a running gag in the comic strips, when Snoopy is mentioned to owning a Van Gogh (though the picture is never actually seen).
  • Was pre-nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.
  • LOGO GIMMICK: Schroeder is seen playing the 20th Century Fox Theme in the opening "20th Century Fox" logo. He was playing the theme on his piano.
  • On the list of posted standardized test grades, the name "Heather Wold" is seen. "Heather" was the name given to the little red-haired girl in "It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown (1977)." Donna Wold was Charles Schulz's red-haired girlfriend, who turned down his marriage proposal in 1950 (the same year the comic strip began) and upon whom the unattainable character in "Peanuts" was based.
  • Kristin Chenoweth's second Blue Sky Studios film after Rio 2 (2014).
  • The vehicle Woodstock was in as the children were ice skating, is a Zamboni.
  • At some points, the author named "Warren Piece" and the book titled "Leo's Toy Store" is mentioned. The children's book of the same name by the said author has released in bookstores on November 20th, 2015, exactly two weeks after this movie released.
  • In the TV specials Linus is a year younger than Charlie Brown and the same age as Sally. But in this film he's a year older than Sally and the same age as the rest of the gang.
  • The kid at the nurses' office at the beginning of the film is the same kid with a kite later on in the film.
  • This film was originally considered to be released on November 25, 2015.
  • Francesca Capaldi, who voices the Little Red-Haired Girl, actually has red hair.
  • Until this movie came out, no Peanuts character was ever shown from any way other than the front or side. In the scene where Charlie is learning how to dance, he briefly does the Chicken Dance and turns around to wiggle his backside during that move in the dance.
  • Linus is in Charlie Brown's class even though he is about a year younger than the rest of his friends, because he skipped a grade. At the time the comics were written, the practice of skipping a grade was more commonplace, as there were no advanced classes or special programs for gifted children. It's important to note that throughout the strip's history, the intelligence of Linus and all of the characters has been highly exaggerated for their age for comedic purposes. This explains why the supposedly 7 and 8 year old children can discuss philosophy and literature at an adult level.
  • The filmmakers deliberately emulated the style of the original Peanuts television specials, which explains why many of the elements appear static or inconsistent. For example, the snow falls straight down apparently without being affected by the wind, because it had that static consistency in the animated specials.
  • From the Creators of "Ice Age" and "Rio".
  • In the pre-release promotion of the film, there were specific reassurances to the property's fans that its score would include compositions of the musician most famous for his music for the property, Vince Guaraldi, where appropriate. Indeed, the music can be heard in numerous sections such as the opening skating pond scene that includes "Skating" and "Linus and Lucy."
  • To simplify the characters for the film, some subtle adaptational changes were done. For instance, the kids of Charlie Brown's neighborhood are in different grades and classes in their school while Peppermint Patty, Marcie, and Franklin are in another school altogether in the comic strip. For the film, all the kids are in the same class in the same school.
  • Blue Sky Studios's 5th film to be nominated for a Saturn Award, the first four being Ice Age (2002), Horton Hears a Who! (2008), Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009), and Rio (2011). But while they were nominates for Best Animated Film, this was nominated for Best Comic-to-Film Motion Picture. (It was eligible for Best Animated Film however.) Like the first four films, which lost to Spirited Away (2002), WALL-E (2008), Monsters Vs. Aliens (2009), and Puss In Boots (2011), this didn't win. It lost to Ant-Man (2015).
  • Charlie Brown's attempt to write a book report on Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace was taken from the 1986 TV special Happy New Year, Charlie Brown. Unlike this film, in which Charlie's report is supposedly a well-written analysis, in the special he receives a D-.
  • The characters of Peppermint Patty, Franklin, and Marcie are students at Charlie Brown's school, and even his class. In the comic strip and TV specials, they are students at a different school across town.
  • First movie to star Noah Schnapp and Francesca Capaldi (who are love interests).
  • The third Blue Sky Studios film to be rated G, after Horton Hears a Who (2008) and Rio 2 (2014). This does not include Rio (2011), which is PG-rated, along with Ice Age (2002), Robots (2005), Ice Age: The Meltdown (2006), Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009), Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012), and Epic (2013).
  • In the animated special You're in the Super Bowl, Charlie Brown! (1994), Marcie's surname is given as "Johnson", but Charles M. Schulz never gave her a surname in the comic strip; therefore, Johnson is not considered to be her official name. In the The Peanuts Movie (2015), for which Schulz's son, Craig Schulz, and Schulz's grandson, Bryan Schulz, were included among the film's writers and producers, both had decided to include for the first time the full name of the character "Marcie Carlin," which appears on a bulletin board at the kids' school. Marcie's score of 92 is the highest-achieved test result (excluding the fluke 100 result credited to Charlie Brown).
  • This the first Blue Sky Studios film since Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs to be shown in a 1:85:1 aspect ratio.
  • Noah Schnapp (who voices Charlie Brown), Francesca Capaldi (who voices the Little Red-Haired Girl), Madisyn Shipman (who voices Violet Gray), Anastasia Bredikhina (who voices Patty), and Sam Lavagnino (who voices some group voices) later starred in Sausage Party (2016), as the Narrator and the additional voices.
  • As of 2018 This film along with Rio (2011) and Rio 2 (2014) are the only three Blue Sky Studios films released during the 2010s to be rated G by the MPAA. The only G rated film Blue Sky Studios made in the 2000s was Horton Hears a Who! (2008) and most of the other films released during the 2000s and 2010s were all rated PG by the MPAA.
  • On the list of test results, the names Violet Gray and Patricia Reichardt appear. These are indeed the last names of Violet and Peppermint Patty in the comic strip; though they were used only once and twice in 50 years, respectively.
  • The first Peanuts film to be distributed to 20th Century Fox.
  • Eudora,Rerun and Joe Agate are the only Peanuts main characters not to appear in the film.
  • Blue Sky Studios' first G rated film that isn't composed by John Powell while Horton Hears a Who (2008) and Rio 2 (2014) are rated G and composed by John Powell.
  • The fourth 20th Century Fox's animated film of 2010s to be produced in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio, after Mr. Peabody & Sherman (2014), Penguins of Madagascar (2014) and Home (2015).

Spoilers

  • On the list of highest standardized test scores, the name "Heather Wold" can be seen as the #4 highest score. This most likely is the name of the Little Red-Haired Girl. The Little Red-Haired Girl's first name is "Heather" in the 1977 special It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown (1977) - it should be noted, however, that Charles M. Schulz never considered the television specials to be canon. "Wold" comes from Donna Wold, the woman who inspired the character. Wold dated Schulz for three years, later turning his request for marriage down. The two remained close friends until Schulz' death in 2000.
  • The name of the Little Red Haired Girl is seen on the list of student's rankings on the standardized test. She is #4 on the list and her name is indicated as "Heather Wold". * "Heather" was the name given to the little red-haired girl in "It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown (1977)." * Donna Wold was named after Charles M. Schulz's real-life red-haired girlfriend, who turned down his marriage proposal in 1950 (the same year the comic strip began) and upon whom the unattainable character in "Peanuts" was based. (Wold and Schulz however remained close friends until Schulz' death in 2000)
  • After Charlie Brown becomes popular, the kids struggle over who gets his attention. Shermy (who has not appeared in the film to this point) grabs his arm and says, "I saw him first!" In the very first Peanuts strip printed, Charlie Brown walks by and Shermy is indeed the first character to ever see him.
  • When Charlie Brown (erroneously) finds that he got a perfect score, Patricia Reichardt's "Peppermint Patty's" test score of "65" can be seen at the bottom at #14. This is not only Charlie Brown's real score on the test, but also alludes to the gang's 65th anniversary.
  • When the children are dancing on the frozen pond. They mimic their dances from a similar group dancing scene from the Charlie Brown Christmas special.
  • When Snoopy is trying to use the typewriter the first time, his little bird friend gets stuck in it. Snoopy then types random letters and punches a "W" on his friends forehead. This stands for "Woodstock" the yellow birds name.
  • Just like in the comic strip, Linus is seen in the same class that Charlie Brown is. Considering Linus' age (being younger than Charlie Brown), this would imply that Linus is a brilliant genius; Linus even analyzes Charlie's essay on Tolstoy's "War & Peace" and notes that is really good. However, he gets to be 5th in the list of best degrees about the School's Standarized Test.
  • The Red Baron's plane has been in the air throughout the movie since it has been used during the classroom scene, and then after the credits, the engine on the plane has broken down and it fell into a pond.
  • Other than a scene in cartoon form and for a split second, The Little Red Head Girl never has her face shown until the end of the movie.
Movie details provided by